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Event

Cultivating the exotic in 1800s Botanic Gardens

Event Date: 10/04/2013
Event Location: Ulster Museum,
Belfast

This is the first lecture of the four-part 'City of Science: Victorian and Edwardian Belfast' series organised by Queen's University Belfast (funded by the Arts & Humanities Research Council). This series marks the Belfast Naturalists' Field Club's 150th anniversary in 2013.

The design of spaces for displaying exotic plant species had been developing in Britain since the 1600s. But it was in the 1800s that glasshouse design reached its peak. The spread of building expertise and advances in glasshouse construction were important in the development of these spaces of botanical display. 

In this lecture Dr Nuala Johnson, from Queen's University Belfast, will explore how Belfast’s Botanic Gardens have been used by natural scientists as spaces for exploration, research, discovery and the expression of scientific knowledge.

The lecture will take place at 1pm and will aproximately last one hour. Tickets are free, but there are limited spaces. For more details on the event and how to book please visit the event page on the Ulster Museum website (opens in a new window).