Knowledge Exchange with Policy Makers

Arts and humanities researchers have an important role to play in supporting policy-makers across a wide range of both subject disciplines and government activities. Research in the arts and humanities can inform the design and implementation of public policy, both directly and indirectly. Directly, academics can contribute to consultations, formulate new policy, or develop guidelines for its delivery. Indirectly, they evaluate the effects of existing legislation, provide historical perspectives on current policy debates and interrogate the principles and premises that underpin areas of policy.

The AHRC wishes to encourage arts and humanities researchers to engage with policy-makers, practitioners and members of the public in a way that lays the groundwork for future policy impact. The AHRC uses the following methods to increase the exposure of cutting-edge research to policy-makers across Government.

Case studies which look at the impact of AHRC's funded research on public policy can be found on our Informing Public Policy pages.