Common Ground: the first national gathering of the AHRC Commons

Date: 04/03/2016

Whether you are an academic, a member of a community group, you are a part of the cultural and third sectors, or you work in a business big or small the AHRC Commons would welcome you to submit an applications to participate in its national event. The gathering will take place 21st June 2016, 10am-6pm, Ron Cooke Hub, University of York.

We are seeking ideas from individuals or groups at any career stage, from any sector or discipline within the arts and humanities to deliver activities in one of the event’s nine zones or across those zones. Activities could be similar to those suggested in the PDF Common Ground: Zones Guide, or they could be entirely novel.

The Call for Participants is now open and will close on 29th March. To help applicants in their application a preview of the online form (PDF, 589KB) has been made available for reference purposes only.

Accommodation and travel within the UK will be covered for all participants and catering will also be provided for all attendees on the day of the event. We have a limited budget to support activities that involve additional overheads (e.g. new materials, the need to transport equipment, printing, etc). We hope that participants can use existing material and make use of digital technologies' to facilitate the sharing of ideas.

The Common Ground gathering will enable ideas and skills to be exchanged, new collaborations to be forged, networks to be enriched, knowledge to be produced, and the value of the arts and humanities to be expressed, discussed, and celebrated.

Information about how to apply to attend the Common Ground gathering, rather than deliver activities at it, will be issued later.

Notes for Editors

For further information from the AHRC, please contact Danielle Moore-Chick on 01793 41 6021 or d.moore-chick@ahrc.ac.uk

  • The Commons initiative aims to establish new forums where arts and humanities researchers, from different subject areas and disciplines, can gather with collaborators from other sectors. Such forums will facilitate the exchange of ideas and good practice, helping to build a shared case for the importance of arts and humanities research.
  • The Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) funds world-class, independent researchers in a wide range of subjects: ancient history, modern dance, archaeology, digital content, philosophy, English literature, design, the creative and performing arts, and much more. This financial year the AHRC will spend approximately £98 million to fund research and postgraduate training in collaboration with a number of partners. The quality and range of research supported by this investment of public funds not only provides social and cultural benefits but also contributes to the economic success of the UK.
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